STATES and TERRITORIES

Friday, 1 January 2016

Walk the Yorke beaches and their inhabitants

At about 10 а.м. we left the hospitable Stenhouse Bay Campground to explore the scenic coast of the Yorke Peninsula. First stop was ... at the Little Emu Beach just in 200 meters from the campsite, where we celebrated the New Year. It was so close to us, but we did not reached it yesterday. Because we just started our trip, the children have not yet gotten tired of sitting in the vehicle, flatly refused to leave the car at first. (Of course, then it was very difficult to get them back in.)

Little Emu Beach near Stenhouse Bay Campground, Innes National Park
Little Emu Beach near Stenhouse Bay Campground, Innes National Park


The small campground beach was very nice, and as you may have guessed, it was absolutely deserted. The only thing that reminded us about the people on that beach, was a baseball cap and sunglasses discovered on one of the rocky ledges. Perhaps the owner forgot them on the beach or may be he swam too far away ... It was still too cold for swimming, so kids just ran around in shallow water, splashing it everywhere. They are great professionals in this matter, and in about 10 minutes their clothes were wet enough to consider that they went swimming. Even our little Anna, a few weeks ago fearing seawater, was dripping wet.

Little Emu Beach near Stenhouse Bay Campground, Innes National Park
Little Emu Beach near Stenhouse Bay Campground, Innes National Park

A narrow band of sandy beach is surrounded by picturesque overhanging cliffs. In the niches of the cliffs were hidden stalactites that looked identical to the ones that can be seen in the caves. Some of them look like real sculptures. This beauty is incredible!

 Emu at the beach, Innes National Park
 Emu at the beach, Innes National Park

We were not left guessing why the beach had such a funny name. As we just drove off, and in a few tens of meters we noticed an emu ... no, two ... oh, no, three! Then we lost count, because there were too many emus around. They slowly walked and solemnly crossed the road with their chicks, and always managed to turn into a low bush, when noticing the camera lens aimed at them.

Kangaroo Island Lookout, Yorke Peninsula

We decided to go aimlessly, and soon stopped in front of the sign "Kangaroo Island Lookout". Intrigued by the name, we went down a steep sandy path, but it soon ended over a steep cliff. Unfortunately, we could not see the Kangaroo Island, though, according to witnesses, it was possible. Either way the seascapes seen from these high cliffs were really breathtaking. Far below, under the beautiful rocks, splashed waves, over which flew birds. We enjoyed a sense of incredible space and freedom, we wanted to sing and shout of joy ... so, we hurried back to the vehicle, fearing that the children would really want to fly over the abyss. On the way back we found a bush with very beautiful and appetizing-looking berries, but we decided not to experiment ...this time.

Beautiful purple berries at Yorke Peninsula coastline
Beautiful purple berries at Yorke Peninsula coastline

Next stop was in the Port Davenport Conservation Reserve, as we interested in the sign "Walk the Yorke", and a pointer to some "Shelter" which we already has seen before.  The sandy road led directly to the shore, but we decided to leave our vehicle near the nice wooden shelter and to walk. Unlike previous beaches, there were no cliffs, but the sea life was in full swing.

 Port Davenport Conservation Reserve
Port Davenport Conservation Reserve

In shallow water, in between the laid stones and waved a variety of seaweed, we found some strange creatures. For example, we saw a "shaggy bracelet", with a soft middle, covered with sand. When we tried to dig it gently, it quickly and irrevocably disappeared in the sand. We decided not to annoy it with our attention.

Sea urchins and other sea life at Port Davenport Conservation Reserve
Sea urchins and other sea life at Port Davenport Conservation Reserve

Also we found very strange empty fragile green balls. We suspected that there were the sea urchin shells (later, Google confirmed our guesses). Perhaps the "shaggy bracelets", described above, were living sea urchins, hidden in the sand, but so far we have not figured it out.

Rocks, covered with baby mussels, look like large sunflowers
Rocks, covered with baby mussels, look like large sunflowers

We saw some stones, dotted with young mussels, looked like large sunflower seeds. Unfortunately, we do not know where they move prudently, when become adults. We found just a few middle-age mussels, decorated with a lush brushes of see-weeds lying on the beach. We threw them into the water, hoping that they were still alive. Children ran around the beach, joyfully exclaiming and hurrying to show their findings to each other. Sasha was a bit upset, that he did not bring his microscope.

Huge albatrosses and pelicans patrolling the beach
Huge albatrosses and pelicans patrolling the beach

A huge albatross floated above the beach, and a few cormorants sat on the rocks in the water. Birds were watching the water, and I can bet, their interest in sea inhabitants was not just scientific.

1 comment:

  1. The best foto of Australia. I am happy to say you about it! Sorry for my english. :)

    ReplyDelete